Omaha Hip Bursitis

Omaha Orthopedic Animation by Dr. Darren Keiser MD

Hip Bursitis Information

Learn about Hip Bursitis in Omaha, Ne

hip bursitisHip Bursitis is caused by inflammation of a bursa, a small jelly-like sac that usually contains a small amount of fluid. Bursae are located throughout the body, most importantly around the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and heel. They act as cushions between bones and the overlying soft tissues, and help reduce friction between the gliding muscles and the bone.

The bony point of the hip is called the greater trochanter. It is an attachment point for muscles that move the hip joint. The trochanter has a fairly large bursa overlying it that occasionally becomes irritated, resulting in hip bursitis (trochanteric bursitis).

Another bursa located on the inside (groin side) of the hip is called the iliopsoas bursa. When this bursa becomes inflamed, the condition is also sometimes referred to as hip bursitis, but the pain is located in the groin area. This condition is not as common as trochanteric bursitis, but is treated in a similar manner.

Omaha Hip Bursitis Doctor

Hip Bursitis Symptoms

The main symptom of hip bursitis is pain at the point of the hip. The pain usually extends to the outside of the thigh area. In the early stages, the pain is usually described as sharp and intense. Later, it may feel more achy and spread out.

Typically, the pain is worse at night, when lying on the affected hip, and when getting up from a chair after being seated for a while. It also may get worse with prolonged walking, stair climbing, or squatting.

Hip Bursitis Description

To diagnosis hip bursitis, the doctor will perform a comprehensive physical examination, looking for tenderness in the area of the point of the hip. He or she may also perform additional tests to rule out other possible injuries or conditions. These tests can include radiography (x-rays), bone scanning, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Hip Bursitis Surgery

Omaha Hip Bursitis Surgeon – Dr. Darren Keiser

Surgery is rarely needed for hip bursitis. If the bursa remains inflamed and painful after all nonsurgical treatments have been tried, your doctor may recommend surgical removal of the bursa. Removal of the bursa does not hurt the hip, and the hip can actually function normally without it.

A newer technique that is gaining popularity is arthroscopic removal of the bursa. In this technique, the bursa is removed through a small (1/4-inch) incision over the hip. A tiny camera, or arthroscope, is placed in a second incision so the doctor can guide the surgical instruments and cut out the bursa. This surgery is much less invasive, and recovery is quicker and less painful.

Both types of surgeries are done on an outpatient (day surgery) basis, so an overnight stay in the hospital is not usually necessary. Early studies show arthroscopic removal of the bursa to be quite effective, but this is still currently being studied.

**Call the office of Dr. Darren Keiser to set up an appointment & learn if hip bursitis surgery is right for you.